Cloud Computing & Mobile Devices Are About To Change Your Life
0Overall Score

Stand by for your life and business to change dramatically over the next five to 10 years as exponential growth in mobile computing, cloud computing, collaboration and digital media sweeps Australia.

Stand by for your life and business to change dramatically over the next five to 10 years as exponential growth in mobile computing, cloud computing, collaboration and digital media sweeps Australia.

That’s the message from market research group Frost & Sullivan which yesterday unrolled its ICT outlook for 2011 and beyond to the Down Under media.

At home and out on the street Australians can expect to be bombarded by new forms of advertising, with both online video ads and mobile advertising expected to rise exponentially, according to analyst Phil Harpur.

F&S predicts Australian online advertising to hit $4 billion by 2015, up from just over $2 billion in 2010; expenditure on online video ads – currently stifled by Australia’s lack of bandwidth – will get a boost from the NBN (and presumably LTE), reaching $180 million in the same period, a CAGR of 39pc.

Mobile advertising, still in its infancy with just $10 million in sales last year, and held back by a relatively low penetration of smartphones, should take off as penetration reaches 60 percent of all mobiles. Harpur predicts revenues of close to $50 million by 2015.

He also predicts strong growth in online shopping – from $12 billion in 2010 to $18 billion in 2015 – but most of the money will still be going to overseas e-tailers, regardless of the outcome of the current push by traditional retailers to have GST imposed on all sales, he said.

 In the enterprise computing world, F&S says cloud computing is where it’s all happening, with Australia setting the pace in Asia-Pacific. Some 35 percent of Australian businesses have now adopted some form of cloud and will continue to lead, said analyst Arun Chandrasekaran.

By contrast the adoption rate in Singapore is only 18 percent and Hong Kong is at 22 percent.

Cloud will significantly disrupt the entire ICT landscape, Chandrasekaran predicted, with SaaS facing explosive growth and PaaS (platform-as-a service) emerging as a key battleground.

Despite a slow start, the Australian Government would get serious in promoting cloud, with increasing adoption of the public cloud from 2011, and moving into private and community clouds from 2012.

Government would initially identify a panel of cloud providers, and from 2012 would establish a whole-of-government storefront. – David Frith