Steve Jobs Ghost Haunts Samsung Trial?
0Overall Score

He was the Father of Apple, but Steve Jobs should not influence the upcoming trial, a US judge said.


Click to enlarge

As the patent trial between Samsung and Apple inches closer, Samsung is arguing declarations by Apple’s deceased CEO Steve Jobs should be included in evidence to prove the “bias” Apple has against its tech rivals.

Apple’s former CEO declared “thermonuclear war ” on Android and pledged to “spend Apple’s last penny”, to “wrong this right” after it launched a rival OS in 2010, believing it was copying Apple’s mobile innovations.

Samsung is arguing the quotes, revealed in the ‘Steve Jobs’ biography released in 2011, “speaks to Apple’s bias, improper motives and its lack of belief in its own claims in that they are a means to an end, namely the destruction of Android.”

Apple argued the quotes were inadmissible and asked they be removed as evidence in the trial evicence.

The US District Court judge Lucy Koh agrees.

“I really don’t think this is a trial about Steve Jobs,” she declared,
Reuters reports.

Jobs was said to have been ‘livid’ when HTC launched its Google Android OS touch phone, vowing to destroy its rival at all costs.

Samsung was later to launch a slew of Android based smartphones and tablets, and overtake Apple as the largest smartphone maker in the world.

“I’m going to destroy Android, because it’s a stolen product. I’m willing to go thermonuclear war on this,” Jobs said.

Cupertino went on to sue the Taiwanese phone maker, HTC for alleged patent infringements and Samsung, accusing the latter of ‘slavishly copying’ the look and feel of their iPhone and iPad as well as infringing upon Apple’s owned patents.

The legal stoush between the tech two tech titans, Apple and Samsung, is taking place in over 10 countries globally and hit Oz last year.

 

In Australia and several other nations including US, UK and Germany Android powers over 50% of all smartphones.

The Apple V Samsung trial is to kick off in the US on July 30.

Read: It’s ‘Thermonuclear War’: How Jobs Went Ballistic At Google